Monday, September 15, 2008

After almost 2 years, the US has an ambassador in Armenia again.

Since Evans was sacked after breaking with the US policy and acknowledging the genocide of 1915, the post was vacant.

Given that the new Armenian administration headed by Serj Sargsian and supported by ARF-D and Bargavaj Hayastan has abandoned the cause of genocide recognition, it is all but logical for an ambassador to be appointed without acknowledging the genocide herself. She was smart enough at the time to acknowledge it without acknowledging it.

The solution for us to avoid such situations in the future is for the American Armenians to vote for the Obama - Biden ticket en masse since McCain, just like George W. Bush, has actually denied that the Metz Yeghern ever took place.

9 comments:

Ani said...

I found an interesting article and put it up on khosq.com: http://tinyurl.com/6afppx

[...]
"Support for the genocide resolution is important in the presidential race and can have a significant impact," said Barlow Der Mugrdechian, coordinator of the Armenian Studies Program at California State University, Fresno.

The potential short-term political cost is readily apparent. Estimates of the number of Armenian-Americans range from 385,000, in the 2000 Census, to more than 1 million. Many track the genocide issue closely.

By contrast, only 117,000 U.S. residents nationwide claimed Turkish ancestry. In comparing grassroots political strength, the Armenian-American community wins hands down.

"There are many Armenians in states such as Michigan and Florida," Der Mugrdechian noted. "Since the race is expected to be close in these states, and many others, the Armenian vote could prove to be the difference."
[...]

--Additionally, I think that both Indiana and California are considered in play as well, so the influence of Armenians on this election could well be a key deciding factor (!!). (Perhaps not all those Armenians living in Alaska, though) ;)

nazarian said...

There are only a handful of Armenians in Indiana so it's not going to be much of a factor. Plus, it's a red state and I don't think it's gonna change any time soon, especially with a non-white Democratic contender.

Ani said...

I live in hope of a true 98% turnout in Gary and Hammond...

nazarian said...

You've been in Indiana?

Ani said...

The beautiful scenic byways of I-80 and I-90...

nazarian said...

:) Not the best sightseeing opportunities but it's the only way to get from Chicago to Detroit. I think any of the non-major urban areas in the rust belt are like that. As the industry has moved abroad, these places have decayed to a something like the old Soviet era industrial zone of, say, Vanadzor.

I don't know if you have been to Vanadzor or Alaverdi or some parts of industrial Yerevan but these areas have a striking resemblance with what you find in Gary or some places in West Virginia. Except, of course, the pollution from the Alaverdi copper plant is far worse than what you can encounter in the US.

spm said...

I disagree. I think Armenian-Americans must vote for Obama, because McCain is basically going to screw this planet continuing the job started by Bush. I am sorry to say that I personally know Armenian-Americans, a very nice people otherwise, who are not going to vote for Obama, because he is not white enough and therefore they can not trust him.

spm said...

I mean, I disagree that Armenians should vote for Obama just because he promised to recognize Genocide and McCain certainly would not. I think more important things are at stake.

Ani said...

spm, I certainly agree with that sentiment; however, what motivates some people to actually go to the polls rather than stay home is often a single issue, and those single-issue voters are usually Republican (like abortion, gay marriage, guns, etc.) The Democrats have the advantage on this issue, so if Armenian Americans are undecided, or if they are race-prejudiced against Obama, maybe this issue could tip them toward the Democrats or toward showing up rather than staying home.