Tuesday, November 04, 2008

WE WIN!


WE WIN!


16 comments:

spm said...

CONGRATS!
May be Armenia also needs educated, open minded and less corrupt president?

Ani said...

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Forward, America!! ;)

And your state of Indiana, absolutely still lavender, after starting to count first...guess we'll wait till tomorrow on that count, huh?

Haik said...

i guess things have really changed in Indy. It is become a more free thinking and open minded state. I dont think Obama will win in numbers there but this tight race is good enough to consider a win.
As for the elections as a whole the map reminds me of the confederation and union divide. I am glad the union won this time as well.

Haik said...

Indiana is now coloured in blue.
amazing.

nazarian said...

Indiana went blue for the first time since the 60-s when Civil Rights were given to black people by Johnson (a Democrat). It's an amazing feat since the state has always been considered a Republican backyard...

But the story of Virginia, and probably N. Carolina, are more amazing. These were Confederate states and now have voted for what they consider a non-white.

Yesterday was a historic moment for America. We may have turned a a heavy and ugly page in history. Only a little more than 40 years ago people considered black did not even have the right to vote, sit in the bus with white people, eat in the same restaurant or use the same restroom. In the South such as Lousiana there are still places where the three bathrooms exist (originally intended as one for white women, one for white men and one for 'colored' people) where the third one has not been demolished. The segregation is not enforced but the wounds of history are still there.

nazarian said...

One more thing...

People can relate to Obama much more than McCain. The way he talks, dresses and walks is like me and my friends. That's why he is so popular with the young in the country.

nazarian said...

If you have a chance, read McCain's and Obama's speeches last night. Where was this McCain during the campaign? Why was he so angry then, and why did he allow his GOP people be so nasty?

Obama's speech was as good as always. It's amazing that he kept the negativity at bay at all times. Time and time again he remained positive (one example was not using the out of wedlock pregnancy of Palin's daughter as an issue) and stuck to the message without insulting McCain.

I was getting disappointed with Mccain but his concession speech has redeemed him. Now that the negativity is in the past, I look forward to his positive input in rebuilding the country.

http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/11/04/mccain.transcript/

http://www.cnn.com/2008/POLITICS/11/04/obama.transcript/index.html

nazarian said...

As for Palin. I think she will become a force in the GOP. She has a knack for energizing people and if she sticks around, hopefully she will gain experience and knowledge to be a player on the political scene. Right now she is like a high schooler BS-ing her way through a test after a hard night of partying.

Ani said...

I'd always liked McCain, he was engaging, good-humored and quick- witted, and then suddenly it all evaporated--it was like the invasion of the body snatchers. My honest feeling watching him these last few months was that he felt just as much a prisoner of the Bush Republicans as he was as a prisoner in Vietnam, and he reverted to a go-along-to-get-along attitude and demeanour to get through the ordeal. In fact, he seemed more relaxed last night than he has for the whole year. Perhaps he's not as unhappy as his supporters(?)

Since we can hope a little, at least for today, then perhaps once Obama takes office and the wackos find that their worst fears aren't valid (including having their taxes raised), Obama will be able to actually broaden his support. I watched FoxNews last night to see how they were coping. Anchor Shep Smith had a good attitude, I think, and was telling his viewers to put the anger away and to work together for the good of the country; there were grumblings from other commentators, but, well, let's hope we can have a new start, under a president that was actually, truly, fairly elected.

H said...

BBC coverage was brilliant. The funniest was Bolton. He was "fumigating" from anger. Probably his last public appearance.

You can watch the speeches at: http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/americas/us_elections_2008/7710079.stm

Garen said...

Since I don't have TV (don't believe in it) I was watching the live coverage on BBC website, which was technologically the most sofisticated Live coverage in terms of streaming live video, streaming text and streaming result counts.

Was watching it with a friend (meaning I from my computer screen, he from his and exchanging opinions on GTalk messaging). Also following some blogs and Twitts. All dynamic, live and Web2.0. So, I'd say, from a "geeky" technological point of view too these were historical elections.

Barack said that it was People's victory. Partly true. But it was also the victory of BarackObama.com's web-designers and web-developers, and his Web2.0 team who set new standards of how to politicise younger audiences and spread the message through social media like Digg, StumbleUpon, Twitter, Facebook, MySpace, blogs etc etc. So big-it-up for the Blue web-geekss too ;)

Then at circa 4am GMT I started receiving calls from friends. I guess nobody was sleeping in UK last night ;) They were all jubilant -- it felt like people calling you in the middle of a New Year's night.

Today is gonna be the Bonfire Night all across Britan -- "Remember, Remember the 5th of November!" -- an event that is still celebrated with it's political connotation. And I'm sure with Barack's landslide, there's going to be a lot more politicaly motivated festivity at tonight's bonfires..

Remember, remember
the 5th of Novemeber...

Haik said...

Finally Americans can walk proudly.

nazarian said...

So true, Haik.

Apparently I have a very low opinion of America. When the primaries were just starting, I wanted to buy futures for Hillary becoming the nominee. When Obama became the nominee then I knew that I had misjudged the Democrats. But yesterday I changed a lot of my assumptions about the society.

spm said...

well, now cooling a bit after last night celebration....

to me just the mere fact of overwhelming victory of Dems is not enough evidence of condemnation of neocons.

I will really believe that change has come if deeds of the previous administration are investigated and hopefully prosecuted. I missed hearing Rummy explain himself, but this time I want to hear him do that in the court. And I want to see Dick's smirk from behind the bars.

Haik said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Haik said...

check out this map:
http://tinyurl.com/6daao4